Clouds

Who's Dated Who feature on Clouds including trivia, quotes, music, albums, songs, tracks, photos, pics, news, reviews, discography, commentary, fans and pictures.
See also Clouds Songs

Clouds Albums


Clouds Songs

Filmography

View All »
Selected Clouds film and TV show credits.
No records found.

Self

No records found.

Post a comment:

Your Name
Login or Join to avoid entering this info

Your Email
This will not appear on the site

Comment

DISCLAIMER
You are solely responsible for the comments and other content that you post. Who's Dated Who? accepts no responsibility whatsoever in connection with or arising from such content.





Who's Dated Who? content is contributed and edited by our readers. You are most welcome to update, correct or add information to this page. Update Information
Clouds

Main Details

Other Details

Career

Media

Publicity

Community


Snapshot



Wikipedia

A cloud is a visible mass of water droplets or frozen ice crystals suspended in the Earth's atmosphere above the surface of the Earth or other planetary body. Clouds in the Earth's atmosphere are studied in the nephology or cloud physics branch of meteorology. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Generally, precipitation will fall to the surface; an exception is virga which evaporates before reaching the surface. Clouds can show convective development like cumulus, be in the form of layered sheets such as stratus, or appear in thin fibrous wisps as with cirrus. Prefixes are used in connection with clouds: strato for low cumulus-category clouds that show some stratiform characteristics, nimbo for low to middle stratiform clouds that can produce moderate to heavy precipitation, alto for middle clouds, and cirro for high clouds. Whether or not a cloud is low, middle, or high level depends on how far above the ground its base forms. Some cloud types, especially those with significant vertical extent, can form in the low or middle ranges depending on the moisture content of the air. Clouds have Latin names due to the popular adaptation of Luke Howard's cloud categorization system, which began to spread in popularity during December 1802. Synoptic surface weather observations use code numbers for the types of tropospheric cloud visible at each scheduled observation time based on the height and physical appearance of the clouds. While a majority of clouds form in the Earth's troposphere, there are occasions where clouds in the stratosphere and mesosphere are observed. Clouds have been observed on other planets and moons within the Solar System, but due to their different temperature characteristics, they are composed of other substances such as methane, ammonia, or sulfuric acid.

Clouds Wikipedia »

Related News


Photo Sets


External Websites

List of links to Clouds fansites:


Clouds Links »

Join Now

Register to update information, save favorites, post photos, news stories and comments.

Already A Member?

Email


Password